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Dbrand Sues Casetify After Claiming They “Stole” JerryRigEverything’s Case Designs

Lindokuhle Mkhize

Lindokuhle Mkhize

28 November 20232 min read

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Dbrand Sues Casetify After Claiming They “Stole” JerryRigEverything’s Case Designs

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    Dbrand and Casetify are prominent brands in the smartphone accessory industry, known for their innovative and stylish designs. However, a legal battle has ensued as Dbrand alleges that Casetify has copied its popular Teardown designs. We delve into the details of the lawsuit, the significance of Teardown designs, and the potential implications for both brands.

    Dbrand accessory maker and YouTuber Zack Nelson (JerryRigEverything) took to YouTube to explain the alleged design theft by Casetify, with seemingly compelling evidence of wrongdoing presented in his video. Dbrand and Nelson claim that Casetify copied a line of smartphone cases they co-designed called “teardown skins.” Casetify’s version of these cases is called “Inside Out.”

    As Nelson explains, he’s not the only one who does teardowns and doesn’t own the idea of DIY repairs. If Casetify did, in fact, base its Inside Out cases on teardowns it created itself, Nelson and Dbrand wouldn’t have had any issues with their approach. However, it seems Casetify directly borrowed elements that were exclusive to Dbrand and Nelson’s designs.

    The cases that Dbrand and Nelson create include easter eggs like text that quotes things Nelson says in his popular JerryRigEverything videos, Dbrand’s founding date, and more. Interestingly, Casetify’s line of Inside Out cases includes the same easter eggs and elements, strongly suggesting that the company simply copy-pasted the Dbrand and Nelson’s designs.

    Casetify, on the other hand, is also a prominent player in the smartphone accessory market, offering a wide array of stylish accessories. However, the brand has faced previous controversies related to design infringement, leading to raised eyebrows in the industry.

    Dbrand has taken legal action against Casetify, claiming that the latter has replicated its Teardown designs without permission. The lawsuit alleges specific instances of design similarities, presenting evidence that supports Dbrand's claim. The details of the legal proceedings, including any court filings or official statements, will be closely watched as this lawsuit unfolds.

    “If CASETiFY had simply created their own Teardown-esque phone design from scratch, we wouldn’t have anything to take issue with,” Dbrand CEO Adam Ijaz said in a statement. “We are under no illusion that Dbrand owns the idea of taking apart phones and scanning them. The fact of the matter is that they repurposed our existing designs for their products, then went to great lengths to conceal their illegitimate appropriation of our work.”

    That’s why, instead of issuing a cease-and-desist order, Dbrand is hitting Casetify with a federal lawsuit in Canadian courts, where the company is based, and seeking eight figures in damages. It hasn’t given those suing Casetify any warning, either, so you can see the cases in question right now from the company’s website and draw your own conclusions.

    As the Dbrand-Casetify lawsuit unfolds, the smartphone accessory industry holds its breath, waiting for a resolution. It’s also worth mentioning that unlike the usual cease-and-desist letter (which is basically “don’t do this again, or we’ll sue you” in legal speak) that you see when it  comes to infringements, the company has hit Casetify with a federal lawsuit, and is seeking damages worth up into tens of millions as it found as much as 117 cases of stolen designs. At the time of this writing, Casetify’s website is currently not functioning– and there is no official statement provided thus far.


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    Lindokuhle Mkhize, a skilled creative copywriter and content lead at Trademarkia, brings a wealth of experience in driving innovation and managing teams. With previous success in starting and growing the Innovation and Marketing department at her former creative agency, Lindokuhle boasts expertise in leadership and delivering compelling content. Based in South Africa, Lindokuhle's work focuses on key themes of creativity, effective communication, and strategic marketing.